That Didn’t Take Long

So the reason for the Russian invasion of a small southern neighbor?  Of course its……

My own view is that the U.S. has displayed a reckless disregard for Russian interests for some time.

much of what we are seeing unfold between Russia and Georgia involves a high quotient of American culpability.

The fact is that a combination of American recklessness,

the U.S. helped engineer events that are now undermining its own interests and the global perception of American power.

kind of pathetic that twits like this one think they are actually Americans.

But let’s take a look at these idiotic statements.  We are supposed to respect Russia’s views (like the fact that they aren’ happy about having independent democratic states on their borders).  We are undermining American power.  Big huh?  I though liberals didn’t want America to have ANY power.  That the reckless use of American power is the only thing that keeps everybody in the world from joining in a global chorus of Kumbaya.  But Americans have been reckless (whew – at least that one is on point for the “progressives”) by being culpable in actually supporting Georgia and its efforts to democratize and liberalize.

Remember a couple of winters ago when Russia “just happened” to have some gas pipleline problems and cut off the juice for the country?  Forcing people to start burning their furniture for heat?

And I’m sure it was just a coincidence that Russia “happened” to have 120,000 combat troops on the border with a country about 1% of its size.

As US Troops Succeed, Media Retreats from Iraq Stories

Not really surprising, but the disappearance of Iraq from the front pages and the newscasts is predictable as the situation improves in America’s favor.
clipped from www.mrc.org

After months of improving security in Iraq, the big network morning shows on Friday cited one horrific suicide bombing as proof that “mayhem and misery are back in Baghdad,” as CBS correspondent Mark Strassmann put it. But over the last five months, the broadcast networks have consistently reduced their coverage of Iraq, as if the story of American success in Iraq is less worthy of attention than their old mantra of American failure in Iraq.
On all three networks, however, journalists are admitting that the U.S. strategy is yielding success. “As a new year begins, overall violence is falling and hope seems to be rising,” fill-in anchor Harry Smith announced on the January 1 CBS Evening News.
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Memo From Hamas

clipped from www.neptunuslex.com
From: Hamas
To: The Zionist Occupation Enemy
Subj: Border Crossing
Please re-open the border to the transit of petrochemicals so that we can get back to the important work at hand: Terrorizing the 1.5 million souls trapped in Gaza under our guns, unprovoked rocket and sniper fire into your country – which really shouldn’t be a country at all, but we’ll be getting around to that in good time – and generally making things miserable for all concerned. Everywhere.
KTHXBAI,
Khaled Mashaal
Ismail Haniya
PS – The kids are coming along nicely. We’re hoping to get them over to your place soon.

hamas.jpg
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33 Civilian Deaths Per Day

Welcome to…..Venezuela. The socialist/communist paradise.
clipped from www.ibdeditorials.com
Quick, which nation shows average civilian deaths at 33 a day in the last third of 2007? Now name the one where civilian deaths average 19 a day? If you guessed Iraq and Venezuela, you’d have it backward.
Shocking? Of course. But true. With even Venezuelan officials admitting their country clocked 12,249 murders in 2007, Hugo Chavez’s socialist “sea of happiness” resembles a war zone. In December alone, Venezuela had 670 murders while Iraq had 476 — and that number is falling fast.
Meanwhile, night travel is strongly discouraged and no one wears jewelry openly. Security guards pack big firepower to guard tiny businesses like bakeries, and bulletproof cars are common.
Cuban doctors sent for propaganda purposes to help the poor often flee for their safety, leaving boarded up “free” health care kiosks in Caracas slums like Petare and Catia.
willingness to fight and to win is the difference between the brave Iraqi and American war effort and the festering mess in Chavez’s chaotic Venezuela.
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What Went Right in Iraq

Aside from our fortune in having George W Bush as commander in chief- here are some very good points from Ralph Peters:

We didn’t quit: Even as some of us began to suspect that Iraqi society was hopelessly sick, our troops stood to and did their duty bravely. The tenacity of our soldiers and Marines in the face of mortal enemies in Iraq and blithe traitors at home is the No. 1 reason why Iraq has turned around.

Gen. David Petraeus took command: Petraeus brought three vital qualities to our effort: He wants to win, not just keep the lid on the pot; he never stops learning and adapting, and he provides top-cover for innovative subordinates.

He ignored the naysayers and supported what worked.

Oh, and under Petraeus our troops have been relentless in their pursuit of our enemies. Contrary to the myths of the left, peace can only be built over the corpses of evil men.

The surge: While the increase in troop numbers was important, allowing us to consolidate gains in neighborhoods we’d rid of terrorists and insurgents, the psychological effect of the surge was crucial.

The message sent by the surge was that we not only wouldn’t quit, but also were upping the ante. It stunned our enemies – while giving Sunni Arabs disenchanted with al Qaeda the confidence to flip to our side without fear of abandonment.

Fanatical enemies: We lucked out when al Qaeda declared Iraq the central front in its war against civilization. Our monstrous foes alienated their local allies so utterly that al Qaeda in Iraq is now largely a spent force – the hunted, not the hunters. The terrorists have suffered a strategic humiliation.

Religious fanatics always overdo their savagery – but you can’t predict the alienation time-line. Al Qaeda’s blood-thirst accelerated the process, helping us immensely.

The Iraqis are sick of bloodshed and destruction: This is the least-recognized factor – but it’s critical. We still don’t fully understand the mechanics of black-to-white mood shifts in populations, but such transitions determine strategic outcomes.

12 Myths of 21st Century War

From Ralph Peters at the American Legion website:

war_pic.jpg

We’re in trouble. We’re in danger of losing more wars. Our troops haven’t forgotten how to fight. We’ve never had better men and women in uniform. But our leaders and many of our fellow Americans no longer grasp what war means or what it takes to win.

Myth No. 1: War doesn’t change anything.

This campus slogan contradicts all of human history.  We need not agree in our politics or on the manner in which a given war is prosecuted, but we can’t pretend that if only we laid down our arms all others would do the same.

Wars, in fact, often change everything. Who would argue that the American Revolution, our Civil War or World War II changed nothing? Would the world be better today if we had been pacifists in the face of Nazi Germany and imperial Japan?
Myth No. 2: Victory is impossible today.

Victory is always possible, if our nation is willing to do what it takes to win. But victory is, indeed, impossible if U.S. troops are placed under impossible restrictions, if their leaders refuse to act boldly, if every target must be approved by lawyers, and if the American people are disheartened by a constant barrage of negativity from the media.

Myth No. 3: Insurgencies can never be defeated.

Historically, fewer than one in 20 major insurgencies succeeded. Virtually no minor ones survived. In the mid-20th century, insurgencies scored more wins than previously had been the case, but that was because the European colonial powers against which they rebelled had already decided to rid themselves of their imperial possessions.

In the entire 18th century, our war of independence was the only insurgency that defeated a major foreign power and drove it out for good.

Myth No. 4: There’s no military solution; only negotiations can solve our problems.

In most cases, the reverse is true. Negotiations solve nothing until a military decision has been reached and one side recognizes a peace agreement as its only hope of survival.  The only negotiations that produce lasting results are those conducted from positions of indisputable strength.

Myth No. 5: When we fight back, we only provoke our enemies.

When dealing with bullies, either in the schoolyard or in a global war, the opposite is true: if you don’t fight back, you encourage your enemy to behave more viciously.

Passive resistance only works when directed against rule-of-law states, such as the core English-speaking nations. It doesn’t work where silent protest is answered with a bayonet in the belly or a one-way trip to a political prison.

Myth No. 6: Killing terrorists only turns them into martyrs.

The harsh truth is that when faced with true fanatics, killing them is the only way to end their influence. Imprisoned, they galvanize protests, kidnappings, bombings and attacks that seek to free them.  Dead terrorists don’t kill.

Myth No. 7: If we fight as fiercely as our enemies, we’re no better than them.

Did the bombing campaign against Germany turn us into Nazis? Did dropping atomic bombs on Japan to end the war and save hundreds of thousands of American lives, as well as millions of Japanese lives, turn us into the beasts who conducted the Bataan Death March?

The greatest immorality is for the United States to lose a war.

Myth No. 8: The United States is more hated today than ever before. 

The fashionable anti-Americanism of the chattering classes hasn’t stopped the world from seeking one big green card. As I’ve traveled around the globe since 9/11, I’ve found that below the government-spokesman/professional-radical level, the United States remains the great dream for university graduates from Berlin to Bangalore to Bogota.

Myth No. 9: Our invasion of Iraq created our terrorist problems.

This claim rearranges the order of events, as if the attacks of 9/11 happened after Baghdad fell. Our terrorist problems have been created by the catastrophic failure of Middle Eastern civilization to compete on any front and were exacerbated by the determination of successive U.S. administrations, Democrat and Republican, to pretend that Islamist terrorism was a brief aberration.

Myth No. 10: If we just leave, the Iraqis will patch up their differences on their own.

We must be open-minded about practical measures, from changes in strategy to troop reductions, if that’s what the developing situation warrants. But it’s grossly irresponsible to claim that our presence is the primary cause of the violence in Iraq – an allegation that ignores history.

Myth No. 11: It’s all Israel’s fault. Or the popular Washington corollary: “The Saudis are our friends.”

Israel is the Muslim world’s excuse for failure, not a reason for it.  All men and women of conscience must recognize the core difference between Israel and its neighbors: Israel genuinely wants to live in peace, while its genocidal neighbors want Israel erased from the map.

As for the mad belief that the Saudis are our friends, it endures only because the Saudis have spent so much money on both sides of the aisle in Washington. Saudi money continues to subsidize anti-Western extremism, to divide fragile societies, and encourage hatred between Muslims and all others. Saudi extremism has done far more damage to the Middle East than Israel ever did. The Saudis are our enemies.

Myth No. 12: The Middle East’s problems are all America’s fault.

The collapse of once great Middle Eastern civilizations has been under way for more than five centuries, and the region became a backwater before the United States became a country.  Its social and economic structures, its values, its neglect of education, its lack of scientific curiosity, the indolence of its ruling classes and its inability to produce a single modern state that served its people all guaranteed that, as the West’s progress accelerated, the Middle East would fall ever farther behind. The Middle East has itself to blame for its problems.

War is Unpopular, but America Wants to Win

I want every single soldier, sailor, airman and Marine home and safe. But if we run away now we will be fighting these jerks forever.

clipped from hangrightpolitics.com
I’m war-weary. Not as a soldier is, good heavens, no. But tired of being a nation At War, and doubly sick and tired of defending that notion against leftist dolts—I mean that with all venom and fury—who refuse to acknowledge the simple fact that 7th century barbarians want to annihilate us and will do so IF given the chance
I hate it, I’m tired of war, hate the casualties and want peace for the Iraqis. Most Americans probably do feel the same—hence the unpopular status of the war. But that does not and never has meant we want to lose it!
The war is unpopular because war sucks and we want the damned thing to end with the United States VICTORIOUS. Only blisteringly stupid far left liberals really believe their own moronically idiotic stereotype that conservative knuckledraggers want the war to go on forever because we like the taste of blood.
The only ones who are going to lose, now, are the liberals, Democrat office-holders and Big Media

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