Denver Post Reports a Crime – Has Anyone Notified the Police?

On Sunday 13 November, the Local section of the Denver Post reported at least one rape.  The local news columnist, bleeding heart, and illegal immigrant spokesperson Nancy Griego had a column titled Children’s Hospital Colorado program gives young moms the start they deserve.  The second paragraph reports:

A girl, 27 weeks pregnant, came in for her checkup last week. Her mother, grateful for this program, was there to support her. “Did I want this for my child? No. She’s 14.”

A few years ago I served on a jury where a man in his early 20’s was being tried for a variety of crimes.  He would cruise the local high schools and give free drugs to young girls who would skip school and go off with him.  One of the things he would also do is have sex with them.

It was explained to the jury that in the state of Colorado no one younger than 15 can give consent for sex.  Let’s repeat that.  No one 14 years of age or younger – regardless of what they say they agreed to or not – can give consent for sex.  And therefore, anyone who has sex with someone 14 years of age or younger is committing rape – regardless of whether the young person says they agreed or not.

Now, go back and read that paragraph.  This is reporting at a young girl–who might have been 13 years old at the time–has had sex.  This means that the “father” of this baby is actually a rapist according to the State of Colorado.  The state has determined that someone that young cannot understand the implications of sex to a degree that would allow them to give any kind of informed consent.

So now my question is – has anyone reported this rape to the police?  to the District Attorney?  to anyone?

We are – rightly – outraged at the neglect of abuse that went on at Penn State.  Many people have lost their jobs and others are being charged with crimes for not forthrightly reporting rape and abuse to the authorities.  So do we have the same situation here in Aurora?

The article explains that they actually ask the “young mothers” about rape and abuse:

At least 30 percent of these young mothers have experienced trauma, usually physical or emotional abuse, Scott says.

“And I think that’s very conservative,” Bethany Ashby, the CAMP psychologist, tells me later. “I see lots and lots of sexual abuse and lots of early rape, rape starting at age 6 and 7.”

I just called the hospital and spoke to their media relations person (14 November 12:00 MST).  I asked if the rape and abuse that was clearly documented in this article was being reported to the police or district attorney and was told “I don’t know”.  They have promised to get back to me.

I also called the Post and asked Griego to call me regarding my questions on the reported abuse.

The Religion of Child Abuse

Brings us this little item:

An eight-year-old girl decided last week to go the Sana’a West Court to prosecute her father, who forced her to marry a 30-year-old man.

Nojoud Muhammed Nasser arrived at court by herself on Wednesday, April 2, looking for a judge to handle her case against her father, Muhammed Nasser, who forced her two months ago to marry Faez Ali Thamer, a man 22 years her senior. The child also asked for a divorce, accusing her husband of sexual and domestic abuse.

I guess we should be glad that its actually against the law in Yemen for children to be married of this young. However, its apparently not a big deal to her father, uncle, mother, aunt or anyone who might actually have the guts to stand against this kind of crap:

According to Yemeni law, Nojoud cannot prosecute, as she is underage. However, court judge Muhammed Al-Qathi heard her complaint and subsequently ordered the arrests of both her father and husband.

“My father beat me and told me that I must marry this man, and if I did not, I would be raped and no law and no sheikh in this country would help me. I refused but I couldn’t stop the marriage,” Nojoud Nasser told the Yemen Times. “I asked and begged my mother, father, and aunt to help me to get divorced. They answered, ‘We can do nothing. If you want you can go to court by yourself.’ So this is what I have done,” she said.

And isn’t the “husband” just one lovely example?

“Whenever I wanted to play in the yard he beat me and asked me to go to the bedroom with him. This lasted for two months,” added Nasser. “He was too tough with me, and whenever I asked him for mercy, he beat me and slapped me and then used me. I just want to have a respectful life and divorce him.”

The court won’t give her back to her family since there is obviously a suspicion that they would just do this again. But here’s the worst sentence in the story:

Nasser confirmed that Nojoud Nasser’s case is not the first of its kind in Yemen, but it is the first time that a girl went to court by herself to ask for a divorce.